Is Amsterdam a Good Move for You?

 

As we’re about to embark on yet another international move, this time from Dublin to Boston, we wanted to reflect back on the move that took us from Tampa to Amsterdam, where we lived for 3 and 1/2 years. Amsterdam is one of the best preserved 17th century cities in Europe, and the city center is a UNESCO World Heritage site. We loved our visit there when we were backpackers, so when the opportunity to move there presented itself, we went for it. But for anyone considering the same, is Amsterdam a good move for you?

The reason we moved to Amsterdam was because Bell was offered a PhD position there. As the Dutch consider the position an apprenticeship, all PhD positions are regulated by the government to pay a livable salary, with small annual increases in pay during the four year program. She took a large pay cut from her job in Tampa, but as I had income coming in from writing, we felt it was a worthwhile gamble to experience a unique opportunity in life.

If you have the chance to work for a major Dutch company like Shell or Phillips, or any job that pays a good salary and want to experience a foreign culture, you should definitely consider moving to the Netherlands for awhile. But here are some pros and cons of living in Amsterdam, especially if you won’t be making a lot of money, as we did not!

 

Most Dutch Speak English

We knew this beforehand and this was a big pro to us. However, we also came to find out that it’s also a con. With the economic crisis, English speaking jobs with multinational companies in Amsterdam dried up, so when I lost my writing job we found ourselves in a tough financial situation. It was depressing to look at job ads and see more jobs for German and Swedish speakers than English speakers, but it made sense. With most expat couples we knew, one partner was out of work and found finding work to be a challenge. Also, most government and day to day important paperwork is only written in Dutch, including all banking (though people can sometimes verbally help you in English). The banking exception was ABN Amro, but they prefer wealthier clients and charge higher fees.

Great Public Transport and Bike paths 

You absolutely don’t need a car in Amsterdam or most Dutch cities. The Netherlands is densely populated so the cities themselves are also well connected, making commuting by rail a viable option. Amsterdam is one of the most bicycle friendly cities in the world, so if you’ll be strapped for cash, consider commuting via bicycle within the city as it’s also good for your health!

Biking in Amsterdam, Is Amsterdam a Good Move for You?

Apartments are Expensive, Especially for Expats

Like any desirable city, rents are high. But the Dutch also have a large socialized housing market, and like any economic setup, this benefits some and hurts others. The socialized housing market drives the free market rental prices upwards, and this hurts short term expats on lower salaries. If you don’t have Dutch connections, you’ll initially pay a higher price for rent and find Dutch people saying “You pay that much for that? That’s too high!” As Dutch public transport is excellent, you’ll get a little more bang for your buck in pretty towns like Haarlem or Utrecht, and can easily commute to Amsterdam.

Our Dutch kitchen, Is Amsterdam a Good Move for You?
Our tiny city center kitchen in Amsterdam got crowded very quickly

Dutch “Tolerance”

Between tolerating soft drugs like marijuana, legalized prostitution and Amsterdam being one of the most gay friendly cities in the world, the Dutch are more tolerant than most cultures on one hand. But the Netherlands is also one of the wealthiest countries in the world, and while the Dutch generally don’t flaunt their wealth through fancy clothing or cars, they are famous throughout Europe for often being uncompromising. We often felt there was a prevailing air of superiority with many Dutch and came to the conclusion that the Netherlands is a great place for Dutch people, and an OK place for everyone else. After 3 and 1/2 years we were very ready to move on, and we did so to Dublin…where we ironically made some great new Dutch friends!

The Dutch are Famous in Europe for Bad Service in Restaurants and Bars

If you’re moving from the USA like we did, be prepared to massively adjust your expectations on restaurant service. Like many countries, mostly young people work in restaurants, but the Dutch often feel like they are above their job to serve people, so they often do the bare minimum. Mind of you, this is less about the incentive of tipping than a cultural mindset, because servers are paid a livable wage in Ireland and elsewhere on the continent and are generally far more attentive to guests in their establishments. Don’t expect Dutch servers to ask “how was everything?” And in the chance they do (almost always after you’re done eating) don’t expect them to care too much if you had a problem. And the more you complain, the worse the service will get. The best advice here is to be patient, and of course you’ll occasionally get good service, in which case you’ll find yourself delighted. And dining outside on lovely canals, beside centuries old cathedrals and next to historic buildings or windmills is amazing and unique, along with Dutch eateries themselves being quite “gezellig” (“cosy” in English).

Dutch Customer Service

While not famous for it, the Dutch can be helpful, but don’t expect them to go outside their job description. “Dat niet mogelijk is” or in English “that is not possible” is one of the most common things you’ll hear for requests that you may think are reasonable, like asking the post office to borrow their dolly to move some boxes, while even offering them a deposit for it.

Is Amsterdam a Good Move for You? Conclusion

We frequently found life in the Netherlands frustrating, but that’s everywhere, and especially when you have differing expectations. We love that there is less disparity in wealth in the Netherlands than the USA, and there isn’t nearly the amount of homelessness and begging that there is in Dublin. The quality of life is relatively high, we had good experiences with the health care system and Amsterdam is a gorgeous city. We loved picnicking on the canals during good weather and thoroughly enjoyed the amazing setting, in 3 and 1/2 years this was something that never got old. If we could do it all over again, we absolutely would, so perhaps it’s good to dive into endeavors a little on the naive and optimistic side.

Boat ride in Amsterdam
 

Where to Stay in Amsterdam?

Hotel prices in Amsterdam vary depending on time of year and availability. Try and book something with free cancellation well in advance when you can, especially for summer and the holidays!

Luxury: 

It doesn’t get more luxurious than the 5 star Waldorf Astoria Amsterdam. Set along the UNESCO World Heritage listed Herengracht canal, the hotel is made up of six monumental 17th century canal palaces. The 2-Michelin star restaurant Librije’s Zusje Amsterdam is perfect for an on site gastronomic experience.

Pulitzer Amsterdam is a great luxury choice located within 25 interlinked 17th and 18th century canal houses, between the famous Prinsengracht and Keizersgracht canals. Combining traditional and modern Dutch design, the hotel has 225 unique guest rooms and suites. It’s walking distance from major attractions, but on a quieter end of the picturesque western canal belt.

Radisson Blu is the one of the best value luxury stays in the center of Amsterdam. Spacious rooms are decorated according to colorful themes. Their on site restaurant serves international meals and an extensive breakfast buffet.

Mid Range:

Citizen M is a comfortable and ultra modern hotel in Amsterdam. Every room at citizenM Amsterdam has wall to wall windows and large beds with luxurious linens. Guests can modify room color, temperature, control the smart TV and also adapt the black out curtains all from an Ipad mini.

We also recommend Motel One Amsterdam and Motel One Waterlooplein as they’re good bang for buck, with a great breakfast buffet featuring delicious higher end bakery quality breads, pastries and croissants. All rooms have a private bathroom, air conditioning and flat screen TV.

Lloyd Hotel offers unique rooms in a transformed historic building. Within 10 minutes you can reach Amsterdam Central Station by tram. Rooms come in different shapes and sizes, so this is a good stay for travelers who get freaked out by cookie cutter hotels.

Budget:

You’ll generally find the best value booking short stay apartments in the Netherlands, especially in Amsterdam’s historic center during summer and popular holidays like New Year’s and King’s Day. If you’ve never used Airbnb, sign up here for free and receive $40 credit off your first stay!

Backpackers should consider fun options like the popular Flying Pig Downtown and Flying Pig Uptown.

Want to travel to Amsterdam for Free?

Play the credit card points game and use bonus point sign ups for free plane tickets! The most popular card among travel hackers is the Chase Sapphire Reserve. The card also includes complimentary priority pass lounge access with free food, drinks and wifi. The annual fee seems steep at $450, but it includes $300 in travel credits. The 50,000 bonus point sign up is good for $750 in travel credit, enough for a free plane ticket to Amsterdam from the United States! They’ll also compensate you $100 for free Global Entry and TSA pre-check to skip airport lines.

If you don’t travel very frequently, the Delta Skymiles American Express Gold Card is free the first year and just $95 each year after. They give a 40,000 point bonus after you charge just $1,000 in everyday purchases. A free flight to Amsterdam will start at around 60,000 points on Delta, and you can accumulate that difference through purchases over several months. There are other perks to having the Delta SkyMiles AMEX Gold Card, like free checked bags on Delta flights. Need tips on maximizing credit card bonuses for free flights? Get in touch!

Disclosure: This article contains affiliate links. We receive a small commission when you book or sign up through these links and it costs you nothing extra. When it suits you, please use them, as it helps us help you! 

 

15 thoughts on “Is Amsterdam a Good Move for You?

  1. Great insight into a fabulous city. We have many Dutch people living in Australia and we would say that they are hard working but very tight with cash and compliments. Each culture has its own take on the things which makes it exciting and challenging.

    1. For a small population, the Dutch get around so it’s no surprise there’s many in Australia. Many Dutch also like to visit South Africa given it was formerly colonised as a port of call on the tea and coffee trade with the West Indies. Subsequently the Afrikaans language developed there (which is Dutch influenced)…The Dutch are historically savvy business people and are good with money, similar to Germans.

  2. I love a bit of good, ol’ fashioned honesty about life abroad. I have always wanted to live in Amsterdam, and now I have a little more local knowledge under my belt to help me in my the decision making.

    Thanks for posting this — and all the best for your move to Boston!

    1. Hey Rebecca! Thanks so much for the well wishes on Boston, that’s most appreciated. Even though this is my country, it’s a new city and state so we don’t necessarily find moving to Boston much easier since it’s a far bigger city than Amsterdam and Dublin (both numbering around a million each while greater Boston is over 4 million). And because of so many exclusive and expensive universities, rental prices in the Boston area are very high.

      For a small city the public transport in Amsterdam is fantastic (it’s more extensive and reliable than Boston). If you have the opportunity to live in Amsterdam we say go for it! Please let us know if you have any additional questions. Happy travels!

  3. This was very interesting, as myself and my American boyfriend have just moved to Amsterdam! I can definitely agree in terms of the job market and most people expecting Dutch (unless your job re-located you) and also on the housing prices. As for the service, coming from the UK, I wouldn’t say that it’s really any different than at home, although the tipping culture is almost non-existent here (unlike at home) which does lead to slightly more aloof service. I always figured it was partly because they resent having to talk in English to you!
    Will definitely have to hit you up with some tips re: living here and healthcare/taxes, etc. it seems a bit of a minefield right now!

    1. Hey Julia, thanks for commenting and congratulations on your move to Amsterdam! You and your husband will love summer in Amsterdam. The beach scene in the Netherlands is very underrated. You can really enjoy some great hangouts on Zandvoort Van Zee and other places. We had a wonderful time camping on the island of Texel one summer https://wanderlustmarriage.com/camping-on-texel/

      Yeah health care and taxes can be complicated in the Netherlands. Everyone working for a Dutch company or university in the NL must have Dutch health insurance. But if you work for a foreign company, like a friend who worked for American company Fastenal, based in Dordrecht, there are some exceptions. The Dutch provide some tax breaks for skilled overseas labour, but Bell didn’t qualify for it as a PhD student/apprentice. This is strange as she was invited to work from abroad, so if they could find someone local to do the job why didn’t they? But that’s just the way it is for all PhD positions.

      Enjoy all the wonderful things Amsterdam has to offer and please hit us up with more questions any time!

  4. So, you’ve lived in Dublin and Amsterdam…which would you choose for your first expat experience. Note: will be traveling a lot to other European countries for work. Thanks for your insight,
    j

    1. We just visited Amsterdam for the first time since we lived there and fell in love with the city all over again. Dublin is cool but Amsterdam is more beautiful and because the country is more densely populated it’s so easy to do short day trips to lots of pretty towns in the Netherlands because the trains run frequently. It depends what you’re looking for but we’d probably lean Amsterdam. Good luck with your move and let us know if you have specific questions!

  5. Hi
    I want to seek asylum in NL do you think for someone like me NL is the best bet for me ? if not where ?
    thanks in advance.

    1. Hi, sorry but we really have no idea about seeking asylum, as we don’t personally know anybody who’s been in that situation…The Netherlands could be good, but it depends on your situation and you will have to appeal to their embassy. Good luck!

    1. Hi VJ. That’s variably depending on what you do. Salaries in the US are often higher but you’ll almost certainly get less vacation and the cost of living is generally higher in most big cities. It depends what you’re looking for, but if you land a good salaried job in the Netherlands, you should have a good overall quality of life.

        1. That’s pretty subjective and depends on your industry and expectations, Nick. For younger single people, sharing a 2-3 bedroom apartment to save money, is a good idea for many anyway to help mitigate loneliness/homesickness. So we wouldn’t want to discourage people moving to Amsterdam based purely on salary.

          At the end of Bell’s PhD (4th year) she was making around €35,000 a year (in 2011). PhD salary scales are regulated by the Dutch government.

Have something to share?